Mar 092011
 

 

 

In addition to designer contributions, the report features commentary from fashion insiders and leading retailers discussing the geographic locations currently influencing fashion and design. Industry gurus highlighted in the report include: Cate Adair, costume designer for “Desperate Housewives”; India Hicks, creative partner at Crabtree & Evelyn; Simone Legno, chief creative officer at Tokidoki; Lanie List, chief merchandising officer at Iconix Brand Group, Inc.; Collier Strong, celebrity make-up artist; and Essie Weingarten, founder of Essie Cosmetics, Ltd. Contributors from Saks Fifth Avenue, Neiman Marcus and Macy’s also weigh in.Citing exotic destinations like Africa, India, Peru and Turkey as inspiration for spring 2011, designers continue to satisfy consumers’ need to escape everyday challenges with intriguing color combinations that transport them to foreign lands.  Flirtatious Honeysuckle is a feel-good hue that brings a festive sense of playfulness to this season’s palette. This vibrant pinkish-red for both apparel and cosmetics makes consumers feel alive, and is a perfect post-winter pick-me-up. Spicy, gregarious and persuasive describe Coral Rose, a sophisticated orange that, much like Beeswax, a warm, honeyed yellow, conjures up feelings of faraway lands and locales. Pair either of these piquant hues with a cool, refreshing color-wheel opposite like Regatta for a vibrant color combination that will add zest to any wardrobe. Romantic, fanciful Lavender implies sensuality with its subtle hint of red undertone. Combine it with Beeswax or Coral Rose for a unique counterpoint. Alluring Blue Curacao evokes thoughts of tropical destinations and pays homage to the 2010 Color of the Year, Turquoise. Practical consumers can continue to incorporate enticing Caribbean blues into spring by pairing Blue Curacao with warm, complementary colors like Honeysuckle or Coral Rose. Peapod, a fresh yellow-green, brings an organic element to the palette and is reminiscent of the green shoots that signify change and new beginnings traditionally found in spring. Trans-seasonal neutrals ground this season’s palette and provide a stable backdrop for all of the other colors. The so-called “nude hues” are represented in the range of ethereal Silver Peony to dramatically deep Russet. Another dependable background color, Silver Cloud, is the quintessential neutral that consumers can rely on to coordinate with everything in their closet.

The top 10 Spring 2011 colors for women are:

Honeysuckle CMYK 4-75-24-0 GOE 26-2-4 PLUS 205

Russet

CMYK 44-67-76-9 GOE 21-4-3 PLUS 876

Coral Rose CMYK 0-63-86-0 GOE 19-1-4 PLUS 1645
Regatta CMYK 73-28-0-0 GOE 83-1-3 PLUS 660
Peapod CMYK 56-0-51-0 GOE 124-1-2 PLUS 7723
Blue Curacao CMYK 63-0-22-0 GOE 98-1-3 PLUS 3115
Beeswax CMYK 0-30-78-0 GOE 9-1-3 PLUS 157
Lavender CMYK 33-32-0-0 GOE 56-1-2 PLUS 522
Silver Peony CMYK 3-13-15-0 GOE 13-4-1 PLUS 7604
Silver Cloud CMYK 25-19-23-0 GOE 158-1-1 PLUS warm gray 3

 

 

 

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Sep 152009
 
 With Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week nowunderway in New York and designers unveiling their Spring 2010 apparel collections, the experts at color authority Pantone have weighed in and compiled the top 10 colors for spring women’s fashions.Spring 2010, according to the Pantone Fashion Color Report, calls for vibrant brights and practical neutrals, a diverse palette offering both exciting as well as familiar options for cautious consumers.”Now, more than ever, women are vigilant when it comes to spending,” Pantone Color Institute Executive Director Leatrice Eiseman said in the report. “Instead of reinventing their wardrobe at the start of each season, consumers want pieces to complement what they already own. Pairing a bold color with a basic piece or freshening up their look with bright accents addresses the need for practicality, as well as fun.”That thought extends to accessories, according to the report, with the season’s neutral basics set to be enhanced by brightly colored jewelry, as well as handbags and shoes.After surveying the designers of New York Fashion Week for prominent collection colors, color inspirations and color philosophies, Pantone has deemed the Spring 2010 colors as: turquoise, tomato puree, fusion coral, violet, Tuscany, aurora,  mparo blue, pink champagne, dried herb and eucalyptus.

Taking a closer look at the tones, falling on the more vibrant side of the spectrum is turquoise, a cool, tropical hue; bright Amparo blue, a navy-esque tone with warmth; romantic violet; greenish-yellow aurora; bold and provocative fusion coral; and tangy tomato puree, the season’s classic red.

Among the neutrals forming the season’s color backbone is the delicate, wispy pink champagne; Tuscany, a warm beige; dried herb, the ultimate green neutral, which will pair well with all other colors; and cool eucalyptus, a classic, practical gray.

PANTONE®
Fashion Color Report Spring 2010

Pdf File – 2.58 MB

 

The top 10 Spring 2010 colors for women are:

 

Turquoise
PANTONE 15-5519
C/M/Y/K 61 / 0 / 32 / 0
GOE 104-2-3C

 

Tomato Purée
PANTONE 18-1661
C/M/Y/K 13 / 99 / 70 / 0
GOE 26-3-1C

 

Fusion Coral
PANTONE 16-1543
C/M/Y/K 1 / 48 / 42 / 0
GOE 16-1-2C

 

Violet
PANTONE 16-3320
C/M/Y/K 25 / 53 / 0 / 0
GOE 45-1-3C

 

Tuscany
PANTONE 16-1219
C/M/Y/K 25 / 35 / 41 / 0
GOE 16-4-1C

 

Aurora
PANTONE 12-0642
C/M/Y/K 4 / 5 / 72 / 0
GOE 2-1-3C

 

Amparo Blue
PANTONE 18-3945
C/M/Y/K 81 / 47 / 0 / 0
GOE 69-1-6C

 

Pink Champagne
PANTONE 12-1107
C/M/Y/K 1 / 10 / 20 / 0
GOE 147-1-1C

 

Dried Herb
PANTONE 17-0627
C/M/Y/K 45 / 31 / 65 / 10
GOE 153-1-3C
Eucalyptus
PANTONE 15-0513
C/M/Y/K 26 / 22 / 40 / 0
GOE 153-1-1C
 
 
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Sep 032009
 
The editors of the fall fashion magazines have spoken, and for the upcoming season, they’re placing their bets on oxidized sterling silver and yellow gold in close-to-the-collar necklaces,  tatement-making cuffs and stacks of bangles.

Front-of-book ads in the September issues of  ogue, Harper’s Bazaar, W, Glamour, InStyle and Elle spotlight designers David Yurman, Michael Kors, Diane von Furstenberg and Donna Karan with models decked out in metal-only designs.

In David Yurman’s ad, a model wears the designer’s collar-skimming cable-chain necklace, while a second page shows a model donning simply his braided gold bracelet.

The creative at Donna Karan presents jewelry wardrobing that’s just as stark, with a model wearing a statement necklace crafted of multiple silver spheres from designer Robert Lee Morris.

Editors also brought attention to sculptural metal jewelry as well as classically elegant 40s-style pieces in the form of collar-circling necklaces paired with brooches and understated earrings.

Editors at Harper’s Bazaar pointed out the season’s edgy attitude by saying, “In a season of urban armor, the easiest pieces are the toughest looking. Fall’s must-have hardware, however, is the cuff–like those Nicolas Ghesquiere did in gold and silver for Balenciaga. Wearing one of them puts all the elements at hand to complete a look. Slip on two and consider yourself both adorned and armed.”

Editors at Elle appeared to concur, with stylists decking their models out in single cuffs as well as gold bangles stacked statement-style to the elbow. And at Glamour, editors advocated recycling old fall clothes via jewelry, pointing out that throwing on one of the season’s cuffs could make a little black dress seem like new.

Vogue, weighing in at 584 pages, didn’t spotlight jewelry until nearly 500 pages in, with cover girl Charlize Theron showing up bauble-free. When jewelry made its appearance though, it was attention-grabbing. Stylists dressed actress Eva Mendes in bangles piled to mid-arm, while models in an editorial on fall coats wore collar-style necklaces, bib-style necklaces paired with chains, and smooth mirror-like bangles on both wrists.

While gemstones didn’t appear to get the greatest amount of play in the magazines, editors at InStyle were fans of citrine and smoky quartz, stones featuring earthy hues prime for pairing with fall’s palette of mustard yellows, deep browns and greens.

Perhaps not surprisingly, given the prevalence of 1940s-style fashions (the counterpart to the season’s edgy, tough fashions), pearls were a pervasive find. While the consumer magazines tended to show a variety of glass and faux versions, Lucky advised readers to stick to the genuine thing, saying, “There is a wealth of great costume jewelry out there, which means you don’t have to splurge on the real thing. That said, skip the faux pearls. They tend to peel and show their age.”

Stylists at W layered long strands and spotlighted chains with pearl stations, while editors for Vogue accessorized models in a 40s spread with short single strands and pearl studs. Ears, while largely ignored, got plenty of attention in this spread, with editors showing a wealth of studs and short, lobe-hugging versions.

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Sep 032009
 
 

Stefanie Schaeffer, winner of the 2007 edition of Donald Trump’s The Apprentice, can now add the title of jewelry designer to her ever-expanding resume.Prior to becoming “The Apprentice” and working with the Trump Organization overseeing a project in the Dominican Republic and concurrently serving as vice president of sales and marketing for Trump International Hotel and Tower in Las Vegas, Schaeffer worked as an attorney defending employers against workers’ compensation claims.

She has since become a television host for such projects as “Know Your Rights,” where she uses her knowledge as a trial attorney to enlighten people about legal ways in which to resolve everyday issues, and “The Hidden Jewels of Golf,” as well as guest hosting stints on TV Guide Channel and The Golf Channel.

An avid golfer, Schaeffer reportedly started having dreams about jewelry after getting hit in the head with a golf ball and decided to start designing and making her own line.

According to a media release, all the earrings and necklaces in the line are handmade by Schaeffer, taking between four and six hours to make. The gemstones, all of which are natural, include amethyst, aquamarine, citrine, garnet, lemon quartz, peridot, purple zircon, scorpolites, topaz and turquoise, and are intricately held in place by delicate 14-karat gold coil.

The collection is priced between $75-$350.

For more information, visit StefiJDesigns.com

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